Honoring History: Two Families Carry the Girl Scout Torch for Over 50 Years!

As we enter into year 110 of instilling courage, confidence and character in girls, we are always honored to learn how Girl Scouts has made an impact on families and communities throughout the years. Thanks to our council Historians, we are able to share stories of heroism, empowerment, and recollections of heartwarming tales throughout different periods of our Girl Scout history.

Travel back in time and read about two Girl Scout families with over 50 years of Girl Scout experience, submitted by our GCNWI council Historian, Elise:

A True Girl Scout Family

In 1968, the Girl Scout Council of Northwest Cook County, honored two families from Service Unit 611 in Skokie/Lincolnwood. These two families, the Roth and the Petroski family, had one daughter in each level of scouting, Brownie, Junior, Cadette, and Senior Girl Scout. Their mothers were leaders of troops as well. It was the first for the council to have two families with such an honor. 

On the right side of the picture is my family. My sister Michele is the Brownie, my sister Sharon is the Junior, my sister Renee is the Cadette, and I am the Senior Girl Scout. My mother was a leader for one of my sisters. We were truly a scout family! One of my many fondest memories of that time was when we all sold Girl Scout cookies. My dad felt he had to buy from all of us and so he bought one case of cookies from each. We had cookies for a whole year! 

On the left side of the picture is the Petroski family. Gayle was the Brownie, Sally was the Junior, Regina was the Cadette and Edal was the senior Scout. Their mother was also a leader for one of the girl’s troops.  

Today, two of us are still involved in scouting. Michele Roth Herman, now works for our council and I am part of the Historian Group.   

2022 Gold Award Class Welcomes 61 Girl Scouts and Six Scholarship Recipients

The Gold Award is the highest award a Girl Scout can earn. It is the result of a girl taking everything she has learned and experienced throughout the Girl Scout leadership program and using those skills to tackle issues she is passionate about and drive lasting change in her community and beyond. It can also serve as proof to colleges, universities, and employers that she is diligent in creating the change she wishes to see.

This year’s Class of 2022 Gold Award Girl Scouts includes 61 young women, six of which have received GCNWI scholarship awards in addition to their highest award. Read about their projects below!

GCNWI Scholarship Recipients

Moorea G. The Journey: A Girl’s Guide to the Challenges of Life

For my Gold Award I created The Journey:  A Girl’s Guide to the Challenges of Life. It is a book meant to empower girls of all ages and guide them through the many obstacles that they will face when transitioning from a young girl to a young woman. This book discusses topics such as setting boundaries, bullying, sexual assault, gender inequity, systemic racism, homophobia, body image, and mental health. Through this book, young girls will begin to understand these essential concepts and apply them in their own lives as they go through the journey of life. 

Megan G. Sweet Dreams

My project addressed the lack of resources available to families impacted by domestic abuse. With the help of a previous Consumer Science teacher, I constructed an ongoing project to help raise awareness of domestic violence to local students by allowing them to sew and donate pajama pant bundles to the shelter as part of their curriculum.  I made a video to explain the project to the students and how they can contribute to the cause.  I also donated extra fabric to the program to encourage the students to make additional pants if they choose. 

Faith H. Rooted Paradise Club (RPC)

My Gold Award project addressed the issue of bringing the topic of black hair in the conversation and the things that some may feel uncomfortable to talk about aloud pertaining to their appearance. I created the Rooted Paradise Club (RPC) as a space for those to reemphasized that our differences are our biggest strength and it is what brings us closer together as a community than ever before. Hair has been a central topic in my life and the lives of so many other girls and guys, so founding this club allowed me to create a safe space for all to discuss different kinds of hair, which is the first and biggest step we can all take in order to acquire knowledge about the forever evolving society we live in.

Emily J. Let It Rain

My Gold Award project addressed the excess storm water in Vernon Hills and the declining pollinator population in North America by designing and implementing a 300 square foot rain garden at the Vernon Hills Arbor Theater. The rain garden will absorb the storm water before it can enter the stream. I educated my community and inspired them to consider taking action to install their own rain garden. Throughout this project I exhibited at the Vernon Hills Public Works Open House, I was interviewed twice for Channel 4 (posted on YouTube), made an English and Spanish brochure for the Vernon Hills Public Works to use on their drainage calls, and educated several Girl Scout Troops in the area about rain gardens.

Abigail M. Accessible Garden Bed

For my Gold Award project I created a raised garden bed for Woodview Elementary School in order to make participating in their garden program easier for kids with special needs. Over the course of my project I did lots of research, made blueprints, and constructed the garden bed, which was ready to use this spring. It was amazing working with different members of my community to make this happen and I am so grateful for all of their help! 

Priyanka P. Native Bee Conservation

I created and implemented bee houses for native bee species at Fullersburg Woods and worked with the Dupage Forest Preserve to add educational information pertaining to these bees to their center. I made these houses in order to attract more bees to the location and allow a habitat for them, something that is continuously being lost from the natural world. In addition, the education allowed visitors to the preserve to learn about the conservation of these insects and the efforts that it requires. I was responsible for the design, research, and creation of the houses, along with the majority of the educational add-ons. 

Animals

Grace N. Greyhound Adoption Awareness Children’s Book

My Gold Award project focused on raising awareness for the growing number of retired racing greyhounds in need of homes in the United States, especially after greyhound racing was effectively banned in the state of Florida in 2020. Through the creation of a children’s book, this project sought to raise awareness of the breed in the Chicago Northwest suburbs, as many families in that area have the means to support an adoptable greyhound. The book, titled “Born To Run,” was published in March of 2021 and donated to local institutions across the Chicago Northwest suburbs. This included 10 libraries, elementary schools, pre-schools, summer camps and pediatric offices. It was published with the generous help of Greyhounds Only, Virtuoso Press and illustrator Sara Niemiec. 

Abigail R. Pollination Awareness

My Gold Award created a native plant garden in my local community to give animal pollinators a safe place to rest and pollinate the local plant life while beautifying the town. My goal was not only to help animals, but also to educate the community on the importance of pollination and the benefits of native plants. I encouraged them to make a difference by creating a series of step-by-step videos and a Facebook page on how to create their own garden from scratch. 

Arts, Culture, and Heritage

Courtney R. Youth Flag Retirement and Education 

I combined a flag retirement ceremony with a youth educational event. I taught young adults and kids about the history of our flag and importance of respecting and retiring flags. The youth involved in this ceremony were also taught the proper way to fold a flag.

Children’s Issues

Madison D. Helping to Prevent Illiteracy in Young Children

For my Gold Award I began by looking at some key issues in why illiteracy was occurring in America. I found that an important part of cognitive development and education for young children is access to books in homes and at school. To help with this, I hosted a book drive to collect books for children at the pre-k level for a lower income school district. I collected over 500 books to be distributed to 185 students across 3 schools and be donated to classroom libraries. In addition, the locations that aided me in book collection agreed to collect books in future years to be donated to the same school district.

Inaya G. Party with a Purpose

“Party with a Purpose” aimed to address the issue of how domestic violence and foster care impact children. All too often, children who are affected by domestic violence and foster care have to deal with “adult issues” rather than being allowed to just be children. Children housed in a local domestic violence facility and some who participated in its foster care program were provided with a temporary “mental escape” from domestic violence and foster care while they were allowed to reclaim their innocence and enjoy being children through the enjoyment of a celebratory birthday party (with food and gifts) hosted in their honor. The goal of the yoga and stress management mini-workshop component of the party was to provide participants with strategies to better manage stress and their temperaments, which can lead to domestic violence situations and poor short- and long-term mental health if not properly managed.

Emily F. Give a Toy, Take a Toy Box

Playtime is an important part to childhood because it helps to support crucial development in children, yet many children don’t have access to toys. For my project, I installed ‘give a toy, take a toy’ bins in two different communities. One is outside of Little Beans Cafe, a children’s play center in Evanston, IL that offers free programs to low-income kids in my community. The other is at a public beach on a small lake in Mudeline, IL that is always in need of sand toys. These bins are for people to donate toys they no longer use, and people to take toys that they need. It is modeled after the Little Free Library book boxes found around many neighborhoods. To expand my idea, I created a step by step guide to help others create a give a toy, take a toy box in their own community.

Faith S. Project Bears that Care

For my Gold Award my mission was to distribute stuffed animals to children who are experiencing the deportation of their parents or guardians. With these bears, children will feel comfort while they are going through these trying times. I hope to spread the awareness of the immigration and deportation process a nd the toll it has on those affected, especially children.

Sarah N. Blankets for Isolettes at the Rush Copley Medical Center’s NICU in Aurora

For my Gold Award, I Ied four teams to create 30 hand-tied blankets for the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) at Rush Copley Medical Center in Aurora, IL. The blankets aid in the development of premature babies and provide comfort to their families. I created an instructional video and editable Google Slides and sent them to Rush Copley for future blanket making projects. I also made a NICU experience video with my parents (as I was born prematurely) that was shared on my social media, and sent out a Google Forms survey to the nurses regarding the impact of the blankets.

Caroline S. Rehoming Victims of Domestic Abuse 

Along with the help of a woman and children’s shelter, I was able to create a program to donate home furnishings to women transitioning out of shelters. My project also focused on creating a donation event to fully furnish an entire apartment for a transitioning mother and her children, with the excess going back into the program for other women. After that was completed I created a implementation and process packet for other large nonprofits to adapt.

Molly S. Busy Bags

For my Gold Award, I created 120 Busy Bags and donated them to a local hospital to help kids have a distraction while they are in the hospital. With the help of my generous community and those around me, I was able to create 30 bags for four different age levels to best fit the needs of the recipients. 

Lauren T. High School Confident

My goal was to create a website with a variety of resources (videos and text aids) with advice for incoming high school freshmen. The middle school to high school transition can be scary and I was determined to ease some students’ minds with my advice. My website contains advice and information about my high school specifically and high school in general. For example, how to schedule classes, how to manage time, how to be involved, etc. 

Civic Engagement

Jacqueline B. Jackie’s Biblioteca

Jackie’s Biblioteca was a project that came from my love of reading and my wish to share that with other little girls. I collected over 200 books, written in Spanish, to establish a library in an all-girl’s elementary school in my hometown in Mexico. I wanted the books, ranging in topics, genres, and reading levels, to be able to provide the girls with the ability to literally take their education in their own hands.

Caroline K. Coping Cards

For my Gold Award, I used my own knowledge of coping skills alongside the knowledge of other specialists and those in my community to create concise “Coping Cards”. I placed these cards in local businesses around my community to spread information about mental health skills and to help break the stigma of mental illness.

Disabilities

Mikaylah B. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Accommodations and Badge Programs

My Gold Award is solely based on the purpose of inclusion and making Girl Scouts enjoyable for all girls. I wanted there to be accommodations for Deaf and Hard of Hearing people whether it be the Girl Scouts themselves or the parents/troop leaders.

Emma G. Accessibility in the State Park

The root cause of the issue addressed by my Gold Award was the accessibility for all visitors of the Indiana Dunes State Park. My family and I enjoy visiting State Parks throughout the year. My sister has a disability that does not allow her to walk long distances so the utilization of accessible parking is very important to my family when we visit the parks. The Indiana Dunes State Park and myself recognized that throughout the years the wear and tear made the lines no longer visible to the accessible parking spaces. Not only were the lines not visible, some parking spaces were not up to ADA code. I worked with the park to fix these issues as well as create awareness surrounding the importance of ADA accessible parking and pathways. 

Kayla H. The Viking’s Library

For my Gold Award I built a mini library in one of the most diverse zip codes in Chicago. This library would provide residents with access to all kinds of books, flyers for community resources and events, and encourage community connection. I included books for kids, adults, books in different languages, and braille books. My hope for this project is that it will help everyone have equal access to books to ultimately decrease the illiteracy rate in some communities. 

Molly M. Better Together 

There are over 200 million people worldwide with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).  This project aimed to help end the isolation of individuals with IDD by promoting inclusion. A video and resources for Munster High School was created with the participation of members from Best Buddies to be used for school orientation and beyond. 

Zoe M. Diabetes Education

I created a website that could help educate people on diabetes. I focus more on Type 1 than Type 2 because I am a Type 1 diabetic. It is meant as a resource for newly diagnosed diabetics but also anyone just wanting to know more since the disease is becoming more common to see. I want to help my friends and other people to learn more about what I and millions of other people live with on a daily basis. 

Education

Sara B. Calm Corner

I worked with second and third grade students at Forrestal Elementary School in North Chicago. My project was aimed at helping these students relieve anxiety from the trauma they experience at home and the pandemic.

Samantha F. Math and Reading Flashcard Kits

I created over 100 math and sight-word flashcards.  These were given to tutors to use with underprivileged in Pre-K through 2nd grade.  I worked with the tutors to create kits which were split into different age groups and personalized ability levels.  I also included in the kits given to each student stickers, bookmarks and a chart to keep track of their progress.

Margaret H. Planting the Seeds of STEM

I established a hands-on educational program at my former elementary school that serves to encourage enduring interests in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) among its students. I supervised the construction of garden beds on the grounds of the school. Three-Sisters (corn, beans, squash) gardens are now planted and harvested in these garden beds by students as part of their course of instruction. I also established a sustainable service-based educational program whereby an extracurricular organization helps tend to the gardens during non-school hours and then finds a successor organization at the conclusion of its participation in the program.

Sophia I. Promoting Books With Female Empowerment

My Gold Award project promoted books with female empowerment and well-written girl protagonists as I donated book club materials that specifically focused on these topics along with the corresponding books. The donations were sent to organizations and community houses that ran after school literacy programs so that they could essentially serve as a “book club in a box.” Anyone could pick up these books and materials and start a book club with a group of middle schoolers. To make sure the materials I was donating were effective I ran a book club with my local middle school where I got to see how students responded to the discussion questions and activities that I wrote, as well as some that I compiled from the Internet. 

Molly K. Scouting the Rainbow

Scouting the Rainbow is a Gold Award project that provides Girl Scouts and troop leaders with a brief but robust education about the LGBTQ+ community. The project is broken down into three concise lessons, each of which highlights topics critical for gaining a basic understanding of the diverse LGBTQ+ community, including historical contexts and current issues. The project aims to show how Girl Scouts can be inclusive, effective LGBTQ+ allies.

Jui K. Open-Source Artificial Intelligence (AI) Curriculum for All

My Gold Award focused on the lack of representation in women in the field of artificial intelligence (AI). I created open-source AI curriculum this is accessible to anyone in hopes to alleviate the discrepancy between men and women in the field of AI.  

Grace S. Page Turners: Giving Old Books a New Use

Books are unarguably an essential aspect of education. However, they are often costly or difficult to obtain. Academic books can be incredibly expensive, and gently used books in large quantities can be difficult to come by. In light of COVID-19, further budget cuts and decreases to school libraries are being made. Now more than ever, book donations are essential to maintaining the quality of education in schools. I worked with schools to host book donations to decrease book waste and increase the ability to help less privileged schools. 

Thea S. Seniors Getting Virtually Connected 

As the rates of online scams against the elderly are especially high, technology literacy amongst the group is pertinent. As part of my project, I created materials to educate the elderly on subjects such as video conferencing and password management. Through these efforts I was able to make my audience more aware of these online threats and arm them with the knowledge to realize and/or prevent them from happening. 

Environment and Sustainability

Carlie C. The “BAG IT” GO GREEN Program 

My project helped to bring non-perishable, non-food items to families at risk of poverty or lack of housing. The concept of the ‘BAG IT’ program is to bring awareness of feasible solutions to students from both public and parochial schools to connect them with their community. The solution- a free, reusable, eco friendly bag made from tshirts filled with the aforesaid items to be distributed along with the Greater Chicago Food Depository food program.

Melissa G. In My Backyard

In My Backyard is made up of a series of kits to be checked out at the library. They provide information on rocks/fossils, the sky, bugs, and flora/fauna that the kids can explore at home, with examples that can be found in their own backyards. The activities, crafts, and information provides some of my favorite aspects of scouting to kids in the community.

Sarah D. School Pollinator Garden

For my Gold Award, I decided to plant a pollinator garden at my high school. Throughout 3 years of high school, I researched, prepared, and brainstormed plans for the garden.  By planting a variety of flowers and plants, and additional spots for the pollinators, such as rocks for butterflies to sun and a bee bath, I was able to create an environment for pollinators that I am very proud of.  Throughout the project, I also write multiple articles for the school newspaper about the issues regarding pollinator decline, the project, and how people individually can help at home.

Rebecca N. Bluebird Build

The issue being addressed by my Gold Award was the lack of bluebird houses in a forest preserve in Lake County Illinois. This work is important because it helped to establish a healthy animal community and a more balanced blend of native species in the area. Having sturdy, well-built, and weather-proof houses will encourage bluebirds to nest and raise families.

Kavya P. Fresh Food-Prints

I created a website that gave consumers a wide range of local farmers’ markets in the Northern Suburbs of Illinois where people can sustain their diets with locally sourced foods. This brings awareness to the fresh food grown locally and the farmers who grow the food. People can learn about the processes of growing food when they visit farmers’ markets and meet the farmers themselves, which encourages them to eat locally. 

Ella V. Green Sense Sustainable Food Packaging

My Gold Award project aimed to spread awareness about the sustainability of different types of packaging and how consumers can make the most environmentally friendly shopping habits when shopping in the grocery store. It is extremely important for consumers to recognize and understand the environmental impacts of the food packaging they purchase. Raising awareness about this unknown is the first step to spreading environmentally friendly shopping habits.

Health and Wellness

Lauren E. Cooking Up a Healthy Lifestyle 

My Gold Award project taught kids how to cook for themselves by hosting a class for kids as well as handing out cookbooks to many people. The class and cookbook taught the basics of kitchen safety and healthy eating. By teaching children the skills to cook for themselves, they are able to take more control over their health and decide what kind of lifestyle they want to live. This gives kids a sense of ownership over their life and provides an important life skill. 

Hermella F. Let’s Escape Anxiety

My Gold Award project was a way for teenagers to learn how to cope and identify their stress and anxiety. Learning certain techniques can help you get through your daily life and eventually for the long term. I wanted to make a difference and spread the word that no one is alone when it comes to stress and anxiety. I made a PowerPoint presentation explaining what exactly stress and anxiety are, along with several exercises that help calm you down and focus on the right thoughts instead of the wrong ones. Then I had a group of teenagers take a quiz before and after the video to observe if they had learned anything new or just feedback in general. 

Riley H. Pollinator Garden for Wings Program

Life threatening domestic violence affects more people than we think, and it happens on a smaller, local scale, which is why I decided to work with WINGS, an organization that provides housing, counseling, and education for survivors of domestic violence. There was a lack of decoration surrounding the WINGS building, making it plain and unwelcoming for clients who visit for counseling. I addressed this issue, and improved the ecosystem, by beautifying the area with colorful plants that attract pollinators. The native plants I implemented will come back year after year, enduring the Illinois weather so the counseling center will continue to be a pleasant sight to greet the clients and staff for years to come. 

Ellie H. Vegetable Information Binder

For my Gold Award I created a vegetable information binder that included recipes and information in both English and Spanish about different vegetables. I made this binder for the Roberti Community House (RCH) in Waukegan because they distribute unique vegetables that are donated from surrounding grocery stores to people in need on a weekly basis. Sometimes the people receiving the vegetables are not familiar with them or how to prepare them. With this binder the volunteers at RCH can copy the relevant vegetable page and include it with the food being handed out that day. In this way when the people receive the vegetable they can learn a little about the health benefits and how to prepare it instead of having it go to waste. 

Emily L. Mental and Physical Benefits of Volleyball for Under Privileged Children

For my Gold Award I taught underprivileged elementary and middle school boys and girls the importance of playing a sport that will not only benefits their physical but mental well-being. I provided the kids with valuable skills of volleyball and athleticism that they will hopefully continue their whole lives. I addressed the importance of teamwork, health, and life skills throughout the clinic. I also provided Beacon Place with 18 volleyballs donated from Wilson Sporting Goods and my family.

Victoria P. Body Positivity and Fitness (Zumba)

I demonstrated the importance of fitness in everyday life while connecting how being body positive is also a great health benefit that can better a person’s physical and mental stability. I taught and demonstrated a choreographed Zumba dance to a group of younger adolescent Girl Scouts. I also made a video that is posted on my YouTube channel and will be demonstrated in the Galowich YMCA Zumba program for a introduction to Zumba to the community.

Allyssa S. Conquering Teen Anxiety in the Midst of Chaos

When the world was hit with multiple crises at the same time it cast teenagers into a world of unknown, stripping them from their normal coping mechanisms and the inability to gather together. My Gold Award aimed to supply teenagers with new coping mechanisms to not only survive but to thrive and push forward with rebuilt foundations.

Suzy S. Kindness Connection Rocks

My project, Kindness Connection Rocks, involved putting painted rocks with inspirational messages in multiple Chicago Park District parks. These rocks were meant to give park visitors something to look for while visiting and serve as a reminder of their community and the fact that people are thinking of them. On the back of each rock was the link a website that I created. The website has introductory resources about mental health and how to get help. My project helps address the decrease in access to mental health resources during the pandemic and foster community and positivity in a time where people are feeling disconnected.

Kendall W. Play Hard

The issue my project addresses is the proper nutritional and hydration elements needed to assist athletes between the of ages 11-18. Sports nutrition is a foundational element for players to perform at their best. Educating players and establishing good fueling and hydration habits will help players to arrive prepared, perform, and recover from a practice, training, or competition, Athletes often realize the importance of training and continued dedication to practicing their athletics skills in order to develop their game. However, the emphasis and impact of fueling and hydrating can be overlooked causing injury. It is important for athletes to understand proper nutrition strategies can help maintain their basketball athletes performance. Nutrition is important factor among many behaviors that can be used to successfully drive individual performance.

Ava Y. Mental Health

My Gold Award aimed to address the mental health crisis in our youth and across all ages. Many people, not just people with mental illnesses, face tough challenges and emotions, and a lot of people don’t know how to cope. I taught children the signs of depression and anxiety, and how to cope with these feelings. 

Human Rights

Avery M. Selah Freedom Patio Space and Games Area

For my Gold Award, I worked with the Selah Freedom home in Florida to raise awareness surrounding sex trafficking. I helped to organize a virtual run with runner from across the United States. In assisting with the virtual run I was able to fund new sport equipment and patio furniture for the Selah Freedom house. 

Micaela M. A Helping Hand for Women Across the Globe 

For my Gold Award I created a website for women’s right issues that are not spoken about enough in the mainstream media. I covered topics like female genital mutilation and digital sex crimes in hopes that people would gain enough knowledge to make a difference for the women experiencing these tragedies. I also included why learning about these issue is important and specific ways people could help. 

Life Skills

Katherine O. Friendship Jamboree

My Gold Award aimed to address how many children suffer from feelings of loneliness or a lack of deep friendships. This program gives children opportunities to discover what they love and build strong and lasting relationships. Also, my program taught young kids coping skills.

Outdoor

Julia S. Picnic Tables for St. Francis Xavier Parish

The church I go to, St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church, sits on a large plot of land. We hold many events (including festivals, cookouts, bible summer camps, and even Sunday masses) outside, but it requires a lot of time and labor to haul up folding chairs and tables from the church basement. I worked with the church to create picnic tables that will be stationary and not require time and labor to set up.

Poverty

Kayleigh G. Little Food Pantry

My Gold Award project aimed to address the issue of families and students who are experiencing food insecurity in my community. This is especially important since the pandemic has taken so much from our community such as jobs which allow people to buy necessities to survive. I created a Little Food Pantry where locals could donate food or take food based on their need. 

Alma F. Creating a system for providing clothing to the homeless

For my Gold Award, I worked with a local Evanston non-profit, Connections for the Homeless, to organize their storage room. When I began my Gold Award, Connections for the Homeless was having a difficult time getting clothing to people because their storage room was unorganized and lacking materials such as sorting tables, laundry baskets and racks. I worked to gather these supplies and provide a solution for their storage and organization needs. 

Grace L. Pack Up Homelessness

Pack Up Homelessness was a two-part project. The first part was collecting donations and sorting through them. These donations were then sorted and used. The donations not used for the second part of my project went to WINGS, Home of the Sparrow, and the food bank. The second part of my project was packing goodie bags or survival bags for people experiencing homelessness. During this packing, over 20 volunteers participated in helping with the packing and over 100 bags were successfully handed out!  

Linnea M. Fix It Up

I addressed the issue of homelessness with my Gold Award project. There are many people living in America who do not have stable housing. This is especially dangerous in the winter time when sleeping on the streets may become deadly. The Interim Housing Program run by COOL Ministries helps families move into permanent housing, and gives people the life skills they need to stay off the streets. Helping COOL Ministries with their mission will allow them to help more homeless families for years to come.

Sheila M. Helping Food Pantries Respond to Allergies

Food insecure people with allergies are often unable to access donations at food pantries that safely meet their dietary restrictions. This can have life-threatening consequences, so for my Gold Award I decided to help pantries provide more options for those with allergies and dietary restrictions.

Public Safety

Katherine B. Bike Safety and Conservation Videos

I often see people riding their bikes in unsafe ways and they don’t know how to take care of the bike. My Gold Award worked to create videos about bike safety and maintenance. Through researching, creating and showing these videos I hope to raise awareness of bike safety in my community and beyond. 

Nicole P. Self Defense 

My project was about teaching  girls how to defend themselves if they are in danger. I talked about different ways you can be on the lookout for any strange behavior and to be aware of your surroundings. I also taught the girls a couple of moves to use if they are ever in need. 

Sports

Hannah F. Tennis for Everyone 

For my Gold Award I created a program for children to learn tennis. My friends and I taught basic skills and provided tennis equipment for each child to keep. I documented everything I did and created a step by step sheet for girls on my high school tennis team to recreate this program in the future. 

Cate R. Equestrian Jumps for DuPage County Forest Preserve

I worked alongside the DuPage Forest Preserve to build and install new jumps in the Equestrian Center. By building jumps for them I both enhanced their already existing
equipment and resources available, and taught others more about horseback-riding and what goes along with it. 

STEM

Erika V. When Women STEM

My Gold Award project is dedicated to getting girls interested in STEM at an early age and focused on closing the gender gap in this field. This involved interviewing women role models in STEM fields as well collaborating with them to create videos. Additionally, I also lead inspiring science activities with large groups of girls that proved very successful. Finally, I built a website that acts as a resource to inspire girls and let them follow their dreams. 

Girl Scouts “Keep It Cool” as Engineers For a Day at NASA!

Girl Scouts “Keep It Cool” as Engineers For a Day at NASA!

Nearly 100 Junior, Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts took part in the NASA Keep it Cool Engineering Challenge last month and got to walk a day in the life of a real engineer.

The workshops, held at the Vernon Hills and Joliet Gathering Places, provided the perfect opportunities for girls to connect with Girl Scouts outside their own troop, or even from another city. Girls were assigned to groups of four and worked as a team throughout the day. They learned about the history of cryogenics, the steps of the engineering design process, and picked up some basic vocabulary to use before it was time to dive into the first hands on activity of the day- ice calibration!

This step challenged the girls to work together to create ice melt using measuring cups first packed with ice, then sealed inside plastic Ziploc bags, and set inside large bowls of warm water. Girls used thermometers to track the temperature of the water and graduated cylinders to measure and record the amount of ice melt. As the girls tested their process out multiple times, it became evident just how many STEMinists there are in GCNWI!

Working in groups proved easy for some, tougher for others, but by lunch all of the groups were working together well and had formed a real comradery with one another. Girl Scout Juniors Madeline and Peyton met each other for the first time when they arrived at the Joliet GP at 9 a.m., and by the end of the day, the girls were exchanging phone numbers and making plans to see each other again.

For the afternoon session, groups were able to utilize a wide variety of materials with the goal of creating an insulation for their model cryogenic tanks that would keep the ice in its frozen state for as long as possible. Groups worked together to strategize how to improve upon their designed prototypes, and by the end of the day, there were some truly unique creations. Cryogenic tanks with multiple layers of cotton balls, duct tape, cork, foam, felt, paper, and aluminum foil. The sky was the limit, and the girls challenged themselves and each other to continuing improving their designs.

The day’s activities concluded with group presentations, sharing what worked well and what could be improved upon next time. These two-day long workshops were made possible through funding from the NASA Glenn Research Center. Program Specialist Jauzlyn Hardy and Program Manager Heather Wirth took part in three training workshops in March, led by subject matter experts from NASA, in preparation for guiding Girl Scouts through the challenge.

“My Mom always asks me after an event – was it worth it?  And this one definitely was!” said Annabelle M.- Girl Scout Junior.

Girls Like Bugs, Too! Spark Day at Rose Pest Solutions

Girls Like Bugs, Too! Spark Day at Rose Pest Solutions

Earlier this month, Rose Pest Solutions welcomed Brownie and Junior level Girl Scouts to indulge in their fascination with bugs and nature with a fun filled career exploration event at their headquarters.

Rose Pest Solutions provided girls with lots of great history about their company and its mission- to preserve and protect the environment with chemical free solutions- and gave them a tour of their home office. Of course, our inquisitive Girl Scouts had questions for the staff who made themselves available, including an operator who showed them the call system, talked about some of the craziest calls she’s received, and a technician who demonstrated his equipment and talked about the kind of calls he goes out on.

Then it was time to meet the bugs!

Girls got a chance to touch and hold live Madagascar cockroaches and examine specimens under microscopes! While working towards their STEM badges, the Brownies and Juniors also had the opportunity to look inside a real wasp’s nest and learn about the important role honeybees and other pollinators play in keeping our fruits and vegetables growing plentiful.

Other engaging, interactive activities included providing stations where girls could dress up like beekeepers, do bug/butterfly/ladybug/bumblebee themed crafts, and even included a pollinator station where girls could make gifts to bring home to the special person in their life.  

Check out some highlights below!

Girl Scout Spark days were designed to provide girls the opportunity to visit several different companies to learn about STEM careers. From engineering to distribution to animal care, there are many exciting careers to explore! Our girls have connected with industry professionals at such Spark Day events as Scout Out Engineering at Groupon, NIPSCO Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day, Animal Aptitude at the Shedd Aquarium, and Spark Day at IKEA.

Want to facilitate a career exploration event with Girl Scouts? Join the Expert Connections!»

A Sister to EVERY Girl Scout: The Influence of African American Leadership and Girl Scouts

February commemorates the month of African American culture, accomplishments, and historical contributions to society. It is a time to celebrate and uplift Black voices and champion their stories of triumph throughout American history.

Girl Scouts honors Black History Month by sharing with you four trailblazers who helped shape the Girl Scout Movement. The contributions of these women allowed young African American girls to increase their visibility and leadership skills on both a local and national level.

Dr. Gloria Dean Randle Scott: President of the Negro Girl Scout Senior Planning Board (1950’s) who—despite segregation—was able to gain the leadership skills needed to be the first national president of Girl Scouts of USA. The Girl Scout Trefoil was redesigned during the last year of her presidency to highlight and add visibility to the diversity of the organization.

Josephine Groves Holloway: Josephine Groves Holloway was a champion of diversity and was instrumental in founding the first all-Black Girl Scout troop in Nashville, helping to desegregate troops in Tennessee. Josephine was also the first African American Girl Scout staff member, serving as a field advisor, district director, and camp director.

Bazoline Usher: A distinguished educator whose ambition and tenacity led to the opening of seven new elementary schools to spearhead Black education in Atlanta. Bazoline then recruited 30 black teachers, mothers, and female volunteers to create the first African American Girl Scout troops in Atlanta in 1943.

Taryn-Marie Jenkins: A National Gold Award Girl Scout who, to earn the highest award in Girl Scouting, made it possible for foster kids to have what they need to attend college with her Jumping the Hurdles – Foster Care to College project. She connected students to college professionals and provided resources and helpful tips to help students manage the transition from high school and the foster home to college. Taryn-Marie’s project was able to sponsor 12 students with supplies and dorm room necessities.

Girl Scouts celebrates these women and Black History within our organization as we continue to pioneer inclusivity, and pledge to continue the fight against racial injustices.

Check out more stories of how Black Girl Magic continues to make an influence in Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts turned “Mad Scientist” gets Introduced to Careers in Engineering with NiSource

Girl Scouts turned “Mad Scientist” gets Introduced to Careers in Engineering with NiSource

Part of what makes the Girl Scout leadership program so unique is our connection to real-life industry experts who spark girls’ interest in career fields they may not have been exposed to otherwise.  

Our STEAM program is no different, as our expert connections provide engaging experiences that allow girls to see themselves leading in spaces that are traditionally dominated by their male counterparts.  

GCNWI Brownie and Junior Girl Scouts, both of which begin to explore science and perform energy audits with other girls at their grade level, had an opportunity to put their knowledge to the test with an introduction into the field of engineering with utility and sustainability company, NiSource.

The “Mad Scientist” themed event encouraged girls to dress like scientists and perform at-home science experiments, participate in hands-on engineering activities and featured a career discussion led by women in leadership at NiSource. 

Girl Scout participating in hands-on activity with NiSource

“My daughter (and her neighbor friend) enjoyed the activities and especially enjoyed the lava lamp experiment,” one mom spoke about her daughter’s experience.  

“My daughter had a blast! Slime and lava lamp were her favorites!” exclaimed another mom.  
 
This “Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day” event was a part of the Girl Scout “Spark Day” initiative, a career exploration program designed to peak interest in various fields from STEM to distribution to animal care.  

Check out more Spark Day stories on our blog! 

About NiSource  

NiSource Inc. Serves over 3.5 million customers and operates as one of the largest utility companies in the nation. The company provides natural gas and electric services to its customers and is committed providing sustainable business solutions. 

Interested in learning more about STEM? Register for an upcoming program for any Girl Scout level! 

Girl Scout Senior Madison Uses Cookies for Community Service!

Girl Scout Senior Madison Uses Cookies for Community Service!

Girl Scouts can do incredible things, especially when they have the drive to do good and make the world a better place with ingenious and creative solutions. Girl Scout Senior Madison is one of these awesome Girl Scouts! Madison shared her story of developing the ThinMints4ThickSocks initiative, aimed at providing support and comfort to community members struggling with homelessness.

Read on to learn more about Madison’s story and her community service efforts, in her own words, and learn how Girl Scout Cookies do good for communities and more!

My Girl Scout origin story started when I was in pre-K. I frequently saw my sister, who is 8 years older than me, leave to go to Girl Scouts. I wanted to be a Girl Scout so desperately, I would often sit in the same room to watch their meeting.

Eventually, I was able to [be] a Daisy and it was the best day ever. I got to do cookie sales, meet new friends, do community service, and spend time with my peers at Girl Scouts. I’m continuing my Girl Scout journey in my freshman year of high school. Girl Scouts has been an enriching experience, providing me with an opportunity to fulfill my full potential in life.

According to several news articles and reports, socks aren’t frequently donated to homeless shelters and are often in high demand. ThinMints4Thicksocks is an initiative that I created to provide socks to the homeless by allowing the public to donate a new pack of tube socks in exchange for a box of Girl Scout Cookies. Rather than buying a box for five dollars, people bought a box by donating a pack of new socks. We then donated all the socks we collected and gave them to homeless shelters.

I created this project because the pandemic presented a challenge for the 2021 cookie season. Because I couldn’t conduct business as usual, I decided to think outside of the box and create a way to combine this cookie season with a charitable drive, assisting people impacted by the pandemic and driven to homelessness.

ThinMints4Thicksocks directly provided socks to the homeless, which aren’t in adequate supply in some homeless shelters locally and across the nation. I was motivated to pursue this project because I realized the positive benefit it would have in the community in helping disadvantaged people, like the residents of Chicago’s UCAN facility, which is social service agency serving over 10,000 individuals annually through compassionate healing, education, and empowerment. 

By raising awareness of the shortage of socks, I believe ThinMints4ThickSocks will continue even after I’ve finished working on the project, by inspiring others to continue donating socks, and other much needed items, (like thermal underclothes, toiletry items, etc.). My plan was to plant a seed and my hope is that it will provide an abundant crop of caring.

I wish others knew about how Girl Scouts is preparing me, and other girls, to assume leadership roles in our future endeavors. Girl Scouting gives me a sense of responsibility and community. Girl Scouts is not just about selling cookies, or community service projects. Many of my closest friends are Girl Scouts. We’ve maintained our friendships through mutual respect, trust, and honesty, which are all promoted in Girl Scouting.

Thank you to Madison!

Learn About Cookies

Welcome to the Girl Scout Cookie Program, the largest girl-led entrepreneurial program in the world. The Girl Scout Cookie Program helps your girl succeed today and prepare for future success. With every box she sells, she builds on 5 essential leadership skills she can use for a lifetime.

Participating in the cookie program powers Girl Scouts’ adventures throughout the year as they learn key business skills to excel in future careers and in life. By participating in different sales methods, girls gain more skills, including: goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics. 

Stay up-to-date with 2022’s Cookie Program when you register to be a Girl Scout! Join today!

Want to order cookies? Try our new Adventureful cookie! (For a limited time only!)

#BecauseOfGirlScouts

#BecauseOfGirlScouts

When I sat down to write about all that Girl Scouts has meant to me, I was surprised at how hard it was to start. It didn’t seem possible to filter through all that I had done and choose just a few important events. Every picture I looked at brought with it a swarm of memories. Every patch that I’d earned had a novel’s worth of stories to tell.

Girl Scouts has given me so much more than just patches and memories. It has given me more than skills, camping trips, and cookies. More than all these things, Girl Scouts has given me confidence in who I am and all that I can accomplish.

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Throughout my years as a Daisy, Brownie, and Junior, Girl Scouts taught me to explore new things. Each meeting we would earn a new patch or go on a field trip and learn something new. Thanks to Girl Scouts, I discovered my interests in music, cooking, and exploring the outdoors. Girl Scouts provided me a place to try new things, learn skills, and discover who I am.

As I grew, my Girl Scout experience grew with me. We started to talk less about what we could do in Girl Scouts and more what we could do as Girl Scouts. Somewhere along the way, my Sisters and I had found a sense of empowerment, and that sense of empowerment changed everything.

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Rather than being told what to do like at school, Girl Scouts gave us the opportunity to take control. We decided as a troop what badges to earn and how to earn them, organized our own service and Take Action projects, and planned our own outings and camping trips. Girl Scouts provided me a place where I could be accountable for my learning and experiences.

I became empowered to speak up about what mattered. Girl Scouts was a place where I knew what I said would be heard and wouldn’t be taken lightly. I found a place where I could express my opinions and ideas and not be dismissed as a kid. Having even one place where I trusted that my voice mattered taught me to keep speaking up and to never back down from what I believed in.

GS friendship circle

It gave me faith that someday my voice would be heard in the rest of the world. Just as important, I learned how to listen to others and to value their opinions and beliefs no matter how greatly they may have differed from my own. In speaking up, I learned the power of acceptance. In listening, I found the importance of being heard.

Even more than giving me a place to be in control or to express myself, Girl Scouts gave me a place to just simply be. After a long week at school, I couldn’t wait to unwind with my Sisters at our Sunday night meetings.

GS Niles Board meeting

Being in an all-female environment I never felt the pressure to “perform” or to be anything other than myself. Our meetings were a place where we could talk about anything from sexism to s’mores and from Take Action Projects to tough times at school. It was at these meetings that I learned to be confident, for it was at Girl Scouts that I always felt accepted for just being me.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Girl Scouts taught me to be a person of integrity, confidence, honesty, and character. Yes, I learned how to sew and babysit, but I also learned how to change oil, pitch a tent, and save a life. Thanks to Girl Scouts, I learned how to change the world in big and small ways and to believe that I could accomplish anything. Because of Girl Scouts, I am a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker and leader) , and thanks to Girl Scouts, I wouldn’t trade that for anything.

Katie Daehler has been a Girl Scout for the past 13 years and is now a lifetime member. She is a Freshman at Northwestern University, and is working on starting a Daisy troop to continue her Girl Scout experience as a volunteer. 

To learn more about Girl Scouts, visit girlscoutsgcnwi.org.

Get to Know…Your Friendly Senior Manager of Travel Programs: Ashley Christensen

Get to Know…Your Friendly Senior Manager of Travel Programs: Ashley Christensen

When I stepped off the plane in Beijing in May 2004, during my sophomore year of college, I knew that I was destined to live in China someday. That month-long study abroad throughout China and Hong Kong changed my life forever.

Not only did it inspire me to be more globally aware and a worldwide, lifelong traveler, it was the catalyst to me living in Hong Kong. Two college degrees, two elementary teaching positions, and six years later, I stepped off another plane, this time in Hong Kong.

I was carrying a bundle of nerves along with my three giant suitcases. Of course I was nervous about living in this strange world, but I was doing it all alone which increased my worry tenfold. Even though I got lost on innumerable occasions, had a hard time making friends at first, and missed my friends and family back home like crazy, this was an adventure that I had chosen and was excited about.

It took me many months to find my confidence. One month to go to a coffee shop and actually eat there by myself, not just take it and run back to the safety of my tiny apartment. Two months to go a movie alone. Three months to make my first real friend outside of the school where I taught. Four months to stop crying to my parents every week on our weekly Skype dates (this was before smartphones, mind you!).

And yet I found my confidence. For that, I am really grateful. Not only did I survive those first few hard months, I flourished for my nearly two years there. Hong Kong helped me to become a published writer, a certified yoga instructor, a world traveler (country #28 was ticked off in September!), and a confident, brave woman.

At first, I was honestly so worried about doing any single thing alone. “How in the world will I ever meet a friend if I can’t even leave the house?” I often asked myself. Then one day, I grew the gumption. I was gonna do it! I went by myself, of course, to see one of my now all-time favorite sites: Ten Thousand Buddhas. I’d been putting it out into the universe that I wanted to make a new friend, and lo and behold on this day that I’d shoved myself outside of my apartment, I met a friend.

I titled my blog post that day “Ten Thousand Buddhas and One New Friend.” From there, my social life skyrocketed. I have been in a friend from Hong Kong’s wedding, traveled to several countries with others after moving back to Illinois, and have Whatsapped for hours on end. In fact, one friend is even visiting Chicago as I type this!

Ten Thousand Buddhas
Ten Thousand Buddhas, Hong Kong

Not only was I changed during those two years, I often look back at my time in Hong Kong and the difference I made with my students. By profession, I’m an elementary school teacher, so I was able to teach third grade at an American school. When I went back to Hong Kong in 2016 to visit, I went to my school and saw some of my former students.

I wish I had a video camera recording their faces the day when they realized who I was; their faces of surprise and excitement were priceless. It still makes me teary-eyed thinking about the kids whose lives I impacted. On my birthday in September, I received an email from a former student wishing me a “Happy Birthday” from Hong Kong! I hadn’t seen this girl in five years!

Hong Kong students
Visiting my students in Hong Kong, December 2016

Some of my fondest memories of my time in Hong Kong are with my students, first in our tiny, dripping classroom, and then to the new school. Though I am no longer a teacher, I still hope that in my current position at the Girl Scouts planning travel opportunities, I am able to make a difference in the lives of the girls.

I hope that through this work I can inspire these girls to be more globally aware and worldwide, lifelong travelers. Maybe, someday, these girls, too, will take that first step off the plane and just know, “Someday, I’m gonna live here!”

Girl Scouts in Mexico
With Girl Scouts in Mexico, August 2017

Learn more about the travel programs Ashley plans at girlscoutsgcnwi.org

Help Girl Scouts Break a World Record

Help Girl Scouts Break a World Record

Join Girl Scouts, the Chicago Wolves and your community for a family-friendly event with Girl Scout Cookies and hockey activities at Allstate Arena.

Do you want to set a world record? This is your chance! We know every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risktaker, Leader)TM is amazing, and we can make it official. Like, Guinness World Record official.

3…2…1…DUNK! Be officially amazing.

We need YOU! Help us attempt to collectively dunk more cookies in milk than ever before. We’ll take the lead to break a Guinness World Record and kick off an amazing 2018 Girl Scout Cookie Program!

The day includes interactive cookie activities; hockey activities for the whole family; meet-and-greet with Chicago Wolves mascot Skates; skate on the ice (skate rental is not provided); and performances by Carly and Martina, plus much more!

To learn more and buy your tickets, click here!